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S.M.A.R.T., Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening individuals, families, and communities.

S.M.A.R.T., Inc. has three areas of focus: Local Prevention Council (LPC), Parent University and Family, School and Community Events


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 February is....

TEEN DATING VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH

Too Common

  • Nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner in a single year.
  • One in three adolescents in the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.
  • One in 10 high school students has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend.
            

Warning Signs

 

You can look for some early warning signs of abuse that can help you identify if your child is in an abusive relationship before it’s too late. Some of these signs include:

  • Your child’s partner is extremely jealous or possessive.
  • You notice unexplained marks or bruises.
  • Your child’s partner emails or texts excessively.
  • You notice that your child is depressed or anxious.
  • Your child stops participating in extracurricular activities or other interests.
  • Your child stops spending time with other friends and family.
  • Your child’s partner abuses other people or animals.
  • Your child begins to dress differently.

What Can I Do?

As a parent, your instinct is to help your child in whatever way you can. This need to help can drive you to quickly react, but sometimes what feels like the right plan of action could stop the conversation before it begins. Here are some tips to keep in mind when trying to help a child who is experiencing dating abuse:

Listen and give support

When talking to your teen, be supportive and non-accusatory. Let your child know that it’s not their fault and no one “deserves” to be abused. If they do open up, it’s important to be a good listener. Your child may feel ashamed of what’s happening in their relationship. Many teens fear that their parents may overreact, blame them or be disappointed. Others worry that parents won’t believe them or understand. If they do come to you to talk, let it be on their terms, and meet them with understanding, not judgment.

Accept what your child is telling you

Believe that they are being truthful. Your child may be reluctant to share their experiences in fear of no one believing what they say. Showing skepticism could make your teen hesitant to tell you when things are wrong and drive them closer to their abuser. Offer your unconditional support and make sure that they know you believe they are giving an accurate account of what is happening.

Show concern

Let your teen know that you are concerned for their safety by saying things like: “You don’t deserve to be treated like this;” “You deserve to be in a relationship where you are treated with respect” and “This is not your fault.” Point out that what’s happening isn’t “normal.” Everyone deserves a safe and healthy relationship.

Talk about the behaviors, not the person

When talking about the abuse, speak about the behaviors you don’t like, not the person. For example, instead of saying, “She is controlling” you could say, “I don’t like that she texts you to see where you are.” Remember that there still may be love in the relationship — respect your child’s feelings. Also, talking badly about your son or daughter’s partner could discourage your teen from asking for your help in the future.

Avoid ultimatums

Resist the urge to give an ultimatum (for example, “If you don’t break up with them right away, you’re grounded/you won’t be allowed to date anyone in the future.”) You want your child to truly be ready to walk away from the relationship. If you force the decision, they may be tempted to return to their abusive partner because of unresolved feelings. Also, leaving is the most dangerous time for victims. Trust that your child knows their situation better than you do and will leave when they’re ready.

Be prepared

Educate yourself on dating abuse. Help your child identify the unhealthy behaviors and patterns in their relationship. Discuss what makes a relationship healthy. With your teen, identify relationships around you (within your family, friend group or community) that are healthy and discuss what makes those relationships good for both partners.

Decide on next steps together

When you’re talking to your teen about a plan of action, know that the decision has to come from them. Ask what ‘next steps’ they would like to take. If they’re uncomfortable discussing this with you, help them find additional support. Suggest that they reach out to a peer advocate through loveisrespect’s phone line, online chat and text messaging service where teens can talk with peer advocates 24/7. To call, dial 1-866-331-9474, chat via our website or text “loveis” to 22522.

  From www.loveisrespect.org   Please visit for more information!         _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 Some dates to remember:
 
The Local Prevention (LPC)
will be meeting the 4th Tuesday of every month at  Southbury Town Hall Room 201 from 6pm to 8pm
ANY community member is welcome and encouraged to join! 
The next meeting of the 2016-2017 season is  February 28th
Hope to see you there!!
 
 
 
CNVRAC Opioid Prevention 
Workgroup: A meeting for
families affected by
addiction 
The purpose of this
meeting will be to further
identify needs of this
population and to discuss
ways that families can
work together to address
this and other addictions
from a family/
community standpoint. 
Wednesday, 
March, 1st  2017
7:00pm - 8:00pm 
Family Intervention Center
22 Chase River  Road
Waterbury, CT 06704
      DATE:                                              LOCATION:

 
  Upcoming Events Corner   
 

The Adolescent Brain Impact on

High-Risk Behavior:

What EVERY Parent NEEDS to Know

Image result for parent and teen

Tuesday, March 7th 6:30 to 8:30 at Pomperaug High School

Renowned author, speaker, and recognized authority

on adolescent high-risk behaviors,

Yifrah Kaminer, M.D., M.B.A.,

Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Connecticut Health Center, will discuss and field audience questions about the effects of various high-risk behaviors on the developing brains of our youth.

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 Upcoming Opportunities:
Teens, are you struggling with Depression and marijuana/alcohol use? 
 
Click below to learn of an opportunity to participate in an ATOM program T-TAAD study at UCONN Health, which may help!
 

 
 
Do you know what to do if you suspect your child is using alcohol, tobacco or other drugs?
Do you know how to have a meaningful conversation with your child about substance use?
Talk to Your Kids

 
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Call us:
1-203-788-5199
Find us:
Southbury and Middlebury, CT
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